Routed in the Past

by

Routed in the Past

by Laura Spencer

by Laura Spencer

Passwords, every 2 or 3 months they should be changed or adjusted slightly in order to keep your password protected account/device secure. So why do we not change our Wi-Fi password for our router? Most of us will still be using the awkwardly long password written on the back of our router or on a card, and not think twice about changing it.  In reality we should probably be changing this password as soon as we can, and then regularly modifying it to keep a secure network.

The complacency that we approach our router security with is quite frankly appalling – it  is so easy for an individual with malicious intentions to hack into a router. Particularly when working from home networks which are not designed for intensive business use. Throughout the  pandemic, working from home has been a necessity for millions of people  working in business of all shapes and sizes, however, the reality of the scenario is that our Wi-Fi routers are vulnerable and we need to adapt them in order to make them less susceptible to hacking as well as other security risks.

With lockdowns and COVID restrictions slowly coming to an end its foreseeable that more and more visitors will be coming into your home. And what is the first thing that most ask?

“What is the Wi-Fi password?”

So what?

Giving the Wi-Fi password to a visitor to your house seems so innocent and somewhat a rite of passage in this day in age. Even my grandad in his 70s asked for the Wi-Fi password when in my garden this weekend! However if working from home, individuals should perhaps consider partitioning your home Wi-Fi, one for work devices such as your computer and work phone as well as one for normal usage for both your personal devices, smart speakers, TVs, and any other internet enabled technology and keep a separate partitioned network for guests. On the same front you could also consider using a guest Wi-Fi and keeping a separate Wi-Fi for those who live with you.

The importance of outdated routers as well as router security comes after a recent report by Which? The report details problems found by its lab during extensive tests.

The main concerns highlighted by the report include:

  • Weak default passwords cyber-criminals could hack were found on most of the routers
  • A lack of firmware updates, important for security and performance
  • A network vulnerability with EE’s Brightbox 2, which could give a hacker full control of the device

The UK Government plans to ban default passwords being pre-set on devices, as part of upcoming legislation covering smart devices. This would come under the UK’s Internet of Things (‘IoT’) ‘Security by Design’ law. The law is aimed at enhancing the security of consumer devices, this comes after the government introduction of a security code of practice for IoT device manufacturers back in 2018 – with the forthcoming legislation intending to build on that with a set of legally binding requirements. This therefore would encourage the individual to keep their device and network more secure – similarly in highlighting it in such report as this and equally solidifying it in legislation will aid the public’s understanding of the importance of keeping a secure home network.

The ‘Security by Design’ law is also planning to make manufacturers:

  • Tell customers for how long their device will receive security-software updates
  • Provide a public point of contact to make it simpler for anyone to report a vulnerability

This will enable individuals to have greater access to information and help in regards to their device security.

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